RANCH HOUSE LAWN CONCERTS

Our annual Music Under the Oak Tree fundraisers are unique live concerts on the beautiful house lawn of Restoration Oaks Ranch. Just over the high berm is the farm store of Santa Barbara Blueberries and beyond that, the berry farm and rolling oak woodlands of beautiful Santa Ynez Valley. This is a sunset and evening-under-the-stars event for adults, though (mostly quiet) kids are welcome for those without a babysitter.  

Bring your own picnic dinner to eat on the ranch house lawn.

Local beer, wines, special desserts and other beverages will always be available to purchase and each year we try to do something a little bit different for snacks and finger foods. No outside alcohol is allowed. Also, no pets, please. Thanks!

Artists that have previously graced our lawn stage have included Elijah Edwards (Fairground Saints and Odd Soul Productions), Jackson GilliesMax Embers and Natalie Espinoza.

Elijah Edwards' songs have received over 40 million plays on Apple Music and Spotify. Jackson Gillies was a prominent American Idol contestant that many Santa Barbara and Central Coast residents will recognize. Max Embers won the internationally renowned European competition Jugend Musiziert in Europe and was an NBC Songland finalist. Natalie Espinoza is a wonderful young vocalist who, like Elijah and Jackson, is locally born and raised.

 

GATES OPEN AT 5:00 P.M. | MUSIC STARTS AT 6 P.M. 

Restoration Oaks Ranch | 1980 US Highway 101, Gaviota CA
Questions? Email Shay: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE WILD FARMLANDS FOUNDATION
501(C)(3) Public Charity 45-4827105

 

 

Long before any local Wine Country existed, the rolling hills and wild oak grasslands of the Central Coast of California were home to cattle grazing and food-producing farmlands. These native oak grasslands are also home to rich ecosystems full of native plants and animals, a wonderful biodiversity of life. Of all the beautiful trees, bushes and flowers in our region, the majestic oak tree may be the most important. Although trees in general provide ecological strength, in many ways the oak tree is our key local species.

They are good indicators of ecosystem health. Among other things, they slow precious raindrops before they bounce off of sun-hardened ground so water is more easily absorbed into the soil and aquifer, their expansive root systems support healthy soil microbiomes, retain water and hold back erosion, their trunks and branches provide shade, shelter, food and homes to other plants and animals, and they absorb high levels of carbon from the atmosphere. 

We know that without lots and lots of healthy trees, our county, our state, our country and our world will have a very hard time meeting sustainable climate management, water and ecosystem regeneration objectives, no matter what technology exists and no matter what carbon marketplaces, funding instruments or policies are implemented.

We also know that just planting trees in the extreme weather conditions of the Central Coast, with no follow up support from their human stewards, will result in a high and costly tree fatality rate. Long-lived, slow growing trees like our oaks need at least 3 to 5 years of care from us before they are established enough to take care of us.

The Oak Grasslands Restoration Project intends to plant and care for 11 oak tree planting sites and almost 1,000 native oak trees in the central valley of Restoration Oaks Ranch. Oak Planting Site 1, when completed, will also feature a wildlife watering trough and guest hide for overnight guided nature hikes, wildlife & bird-watching retreats.

The questions we are attempting to answer include the following:

        • Can we plant slow-growing oak trees in remote areas and reasonably expect 80% or more of them to survive the 6 to 8 years needed for them to firmly establish themselves?
        • What tools and practices can we utilize to cost-effectively manage the planting and care of native oak trees on both private and public lands without access to civil services like water, gas and electricity?
        • Will managed oak tree plantings have a measurable effect on the watersheds and aquifer of Restoration Oaks Ranch? How soon?  
        • Will managed oak tree plantings increase the biodiversity of life above ground? Below ground? How soon?
        • Will the shade, increased biodiversity and plant guilds of managed oak tree plantings support the restoration of native grasses and significantly increase forage availability for grazing cattle?
        • Will managed oak tree plantings extend the grass growing season? How much? How soon? 
        • Can larger scale managed oak tree plantings cost-effectively help Santa Barbara County achieve its climate, food security and agricultural preservation goals?

Contact Ed Seaman if you have questions about the Worm Farm project, the Oak Grasslands Restoration project, our Carbon Farming blueprint or related events and activities on Restoration Oaks Ranch.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 805-868-0329 

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The Wild Farmlands Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) public charity.
We rely on the generous financial support of our guests and like-minded
public and private institutions to accomplish our mission.101920 WFF Donate Button

 

The Wild Farmlands Foundation is piloting a production vermicast (vermicompost) system on Restoration Oaks Ranch to document and demonstrate the benefits of earthworm vermicast and vermicast teas and extracts on ecosystems in general, and on food-producing lands in particular. 

Vermicast is, bluntly, worm poop. Because it is excrement, it is often treated like manure and categorized as a type of compost, which is a pathogen risk in most regulatory literature. It shouldn't be.

Earthworms are pathogen destroyers, not pathogen generators. Vermicast is unique in its capacity to rebuild and sustain healthy soils and all of the benefits that come with it. It is produced in a short period of time and has dense microbial life and macro and micro nutrients, making vermicasting one of the most efficient and effective ways to boost soil health that we know of.

Large-scale on-farm vermicasting should be treated as a viable and sustainable nutrient and biological resource for Santa Barbara County’s agricultural industry. Yet, there are regulatory, financial and logistical barriers to adoption in our region. Our Worm Farm Project is a long-term “proof of concept” that will pilot the on-farm production processes needed to cost-effectively develop a vermicompost system, identify and document barriers, develop farm operation protocols and showcase the community-wide benefits of worms and vermicast to agriculture and ecosystems. 

The SOIL (Saving Organics Investing in Land) project team is studying quite a few different metrics – both environmental and agricultural. The questions we are attempting to answer include the following:

        • Can vermicast improve the health and productivity of perennial berry crops?
        • Can vermicast increase the soil health of cropland and its ability to sequester and store carbon? 
        • Can vermicast significantly replace the cropland’s reliance on synthetic fertilizers?  
        • Can vermicast improve the ability of the cropland to cycle and capture water, and reduce agricultural runoff?
        • Can vermicast liquid extract replace solid composting on grasslands at less expense? 
        • Can properly scaled on-farm vermicast systems help Santa Barbara County achieve its climate, food waste diversion, and agricultural preservation goals?
           

CLICK TO SEE OUR PROMOTIONAL WORM FARM VIDEO ON VIMEO

CLICK TO READ OR DOWNLOAD WORM FARM PROJECT RESULTS TO DATE

 CLICK TO READ OR DOWNLOAD OUR WORM FARM PROJECT ONE-PAGER 

Contact Ed Seaman if you have questions about the Worm Farm project, the Oak Grasslands Restoration project, our Carbon Farming blueprint or related events and activities on Restoration Oaks Ranch.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 805-868-0329 

=========================================== 

The Wild Farmlands Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) public charity.
We rely on the generous financial support of our guests and like-minded
public and private institutions to accomplish our mission.101920 WFF Donate Button